What I’m Reading: Dark Places

From the book jacket:
Libby Day was seven when her mother and two sisters were murdered in “The Satan Sacrifice” of Kinnakee, Kansas. She survived—and famously testified that her fifteen-year-old brother, Ben, was the killer. Twenty-five years later, the Kill Club—a secret secret society obsessed with notorious crimes—locates Libby and pumps her for details. They hope to discover proof that may free Ben. Libby hopes to turn a profit off her tragic history: She’ll reconnect with the players from that night and report her findings to the club—for a fee. As Libby’s search takes her from shabby Missouri strip clubs to abandoned Oklahoma tourist towns, the unimaginable truth emerges, and Libby finds herself right back where she started—on the run from a killer.

My review:
Well then, this book was a little intense compared to the silly, light, & refreshing book I reread right before diving into this one!

I decided to pick up Dark Places as I really enjoyed Gone Girl. (Which I apparently read way back in 2013!) I was in the “mood” for something a little darker, and this definitely filled that request.

Dark Places takes you back and forth between the past and present, going between Patty and Ben before the murders happened, and Libby during the present day as she tries to figure out what actually happened. There ends up being a lot of finger pointing as to who may have killed the Days, and I thought I had figured out what had happened a couple of different times but alas, I was WAY wrong.

The characters were all well developed, but I would’ve liked to know more about Debbie and Michelle, and perhaps even Runner.

Overall, I definitely recommend this book, and I’ll give it ★★★★½ / 5. Maybe read it in the summer in the sunshine though, as it’s pretty heavy for a dreary winter read.

Advertisements

What I’m Reading: The Light We Lost

The Light We LostFrom the book jacket:
He was the first person to inspire her, to move her, to truly understand her. Was he meant to be the last?

Lucy is faced with a life-altering choice. But before she can make her decision, she must start her story—their story—at the very beginning.

Lucy and Gabe meet as seniors at Columbia University on a day that changes both of their lives forever. Together, they decide they want their lives to mean something, to matter. When they meet again a year later, it seems fated—perhaps they’ll find life’s meaning in each other. But then Gabe becomes a photojournalist assigned to the Middle East and Lucy pursues a career in New York. What follows is a thirteen-year journey of dreams, desires, jealousies, betrayals, and, ultimately, of love. Was it fate that brought them together? Is it choice that has kept them away? Their journey takes Lucy and Gabe continents apart, but never out of each other’s hearts.

My review:
I stumbled across this title while casually looking for one more book to add to my cart for a special Kobo 3-for-1 deal. I had never heard of the author before, but the it received praised from both Reese Witherspoon and my favourite author, Emily Giffin, so I figured why the heck not?

I definitely don’t regret my decision as The Light We Lost really drew me in quickly and I had a hard time putting it down. In a nutshell, the main character Lucy is addressing her ex-boyfriend Gabe, telling the story of how they came together during a horrific time in history, and how they eventually grew apart and where her life took her after that.

The book really makes you think about all the things that could’ve been, the what-ifs, and if-only’s of life. What if you chose a different university? What if you chose one partner over another? What if … ?

Although I found the ending to be slightly predictable, I still loved The Light We Lost and would definitely recommend it.

My rating: ★★★★★/5

What I’m Reading: Still Me

From the book jacket:
Louisa Clark arrives in New York ready to start a new life, confident that she can embrace this new adventure and keep her relationship with Ambulance Sam alive across several thousand miles. She steps into the world of the superrich, working for Leonard Gopnik and his much younger second wife, Agnes. Lou is determined to get the most out of the experience and throws herself into her new job and New York life. 

As she begins to mix in New York high society, Lou meets Joshua Ryan, a man who brings with him a whisper of her past. Before long, Lou finds herself torn between Fifth Avenue where she works and the treasure-filled vintage clothing store where she actually feels at home. And when matters come to a head, she has to ask herself: Who is Louisa Clark? And how do you reconcile a heart that lives in two places?

Funny, romantic, and poignant, Still Me follows Lou as she navigates how to stay true to herself, while pushing to live boldly in her brave new world.

My review:
I was quite happy when I learned there was a third book in the “Me Before You” series, even though the last instalment left me wanting a bit more from the storyline. I downloaded onto my Kobo and finished it in about a week.

I really enjoyed the storyline overall and thought it was well put together. I do love that Lou was “still Lou” and that she stayed true to who she was throughout the whole storyline, and that she “found” herself in the end. I thought for sure that there were going to be storylines that didn’t get wrapped up, but Moyes managed to do so in a way that wasn’t too drawn out or exasperating.

There were a few moments in the story though that I wasn’t too crazy about and thought were a bit over the top and cheesy, such as the horse carriage moment and the “fight” scene Lou witnessed when she first arrived in NYC. I don’t know if Moyes was setting things up for a movie script, but it all made me roll my eyes a little bit and I didn’t think it was necessary.

Overall, I enjoyed Still Me more than After You and thought it wrapped up the series nicely.

My rating: ★★★★/5